The flower children of the 60’s had a saying, ”Make love, not war.”

To put it another way, ”Kiss me, don’t kill me.” It was non specific to any sexual orientation but was inclusive to the population. At bottom, most people would be for it, or at least profess a leaning toward it. It was not intended to threaten anyone, or make anyone fidget, except perhaps a cluster of munitions makers, or your local dictator.

Hence when a group called Lesbians for Liberty staged a ”timeout kiss-in” during the Liberty’s nationally televised Women’s National Basketball Association game against the Miami Sol at Madison Garden on Friday night, the first thought was, Why wasn’t I there? Only this wasn’t a conventional puckering up. It was executed for a purpose, in the form of a blissful protest, and with the premise that this was For Women Only.

PC: www.theguardian.com
PC: www.theguardian.com

It is deplorable but hardly news that gays have been discriminated against, in businesses, in housing, even in personal relationships. Homosexual sex has been outlawed in numerous states, and gay marriage is fighting for legal sanctioning. Homosexuals have been murdered simply because of their sexual orientation. And it is understandable that gays would want to stand up for their rights, raise a fist, as it were.

The Lesbians for Liberty sensitivity is understandable. But in this instance, it is misplaced. I wished something that the premier of Ontario, Ernie Eves, said last month after he agreed with a landmark ruling by the Ontario Superior Court that would allow gay men and lesbians to wed: ”If two people decide that they want to call themselves spouses, it’s not for me to interfere with that.”

Your personal or secret business is your own. Lead any life you like, as long as I can lead mine, and you don’t try to foist yours on me. A respectable citizen is a good citizen, regardless of age, ethnicity or sexual orientation.

Some lesbian fans have turned activist on the subject that the Liberty snubs them, asserting that other teams seem to be more active in reaching out to LGBT communities.

PC: www.dazeddigital.com
PC: www.dazeddigital.com

In 2002 a group called “Lesbians for Liberty” staged a “kiss in,” aiming to go on camera during the MSG network’s TV broadcast and on the huge “Garden Vision” screen. Media attention was garnered, even in venues that weren’t covering the Liberty’s chase for a playoff berth.

Of path, there’s hardly a monolithic community of lesbians in New York City; where one group of women in a bar might be heatedly debating the definition of a “charge,” the group next to them might not be quite sure how many players are on a team, and aren’t really interested in finding out.

The Liberty’s President and General Manager, basketball Hall of Famer Carol “Blaze” Blazejowski and V.P. For Marketing and Communications Amy Scheer is both out lesbians, and are certainly cognizant of their status as role models, both as women in pro sports and as gay women. Achiever, for them, is good attendance and a winning team.

“I consider our general philosophy is: we’re a sports team, we’re not a political platform,” Sche says, “We treat all of our fans equally.” This overriding sentiment has steered Liberty manages to throw a wide net for building its fan base.

Advocates of same-sex marriage have skillfully rallied around the hot air of liberty, claiming that laws defining marriage as between a man and a woman curtail the liberty of gays and lesbians. While that claim makes for nice slogans—like “freedom to wed”—it is not grounded in reality.

PC: www.theatlantic.com
PC: www.theatlantic.com

This conclusion is persuasively demonstrated by two amicus briefs recently filed in the pending Supreme Court marriage case—one of Professor Robert George and 46 other scholars and another by scholars of liberty. As these briefs show, the man-woman definition of marriage simply does not implicate gays’ and lesbians’ personal liberty.